8 comments

  1. Thank you for the important distinction on viewing via HTML5 versus truly interacting with/sending user data to the actual course/LMS. There is such buzz/hype around HTML5 and mobile learning, and I agree that in evaluating vendors we must be precise with our language, probing with our questions and detailed in our documentation around their assertaions regarding potential capacities and capabilities. Great post, as always! Thanks for what you do!

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  2. Craig,
    This has been a quintessential “Shell Game” with LMS vendors for some time. They obfuscate, misdirect, manipulate prose at will, all in an effort to get in that initial “hook” into a potential client and income stream. I too have high hopes for Tin Can for it’s definitely the way the technology needs to go, I do think however that its success or failure will be driven by us, people in the industry that mandate we need something different and we need it yesterday. It’s only by emphasizing the need for a flexible, broader aspect training and performance management solution that businesses can customize to their specific corporate management mindset, will vendors make a true shift in the right direction. But, as with any manpower/man-year (programming-wise) draining new capability that in their mind is nebulous to implement and monetize, they are going to throw out whatever terms or buzz words hit Their mark with a prospective client (the check’s in the mail times infinity – aka, vaporware), but will not truly make the effort to incorporate, without a clear profit incentive presents itself. it’s going to take some time for true platform change to happen, but I do agree that at the core is us as industry consumers having better defined requirements and more reasonable and grounded expectations of what these systems can accomplish, regardless of delivery medium utilized or targeted learning participant’s platform of choice.

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  3. Thanks for the article – really interesting viewpoint and quite agree that it is easy to get caught in the hype when HTML still seems young in the marketplace.

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